Wednesday, 18 April 2018

Lesser known fruit (4)

Lesser known fruit (4)

I'm not a biologist, my interest in these fruit is mainly in eating them. Hence all names from wikipedia and/or asking Thai friends for the Thai name. Pictures mostly from internet as I either forgot to take pictures when I saw the fruit or don't know when I took the pictures and won't search for them now. You could argue that the only original content in this post is that I have eaten all of them! 

Eugenia uniflora (pitanga, Suriname cherry, Brazilian cherry, Cayenne cherry, Cerisier Carré, มะยมฝรั่ง)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eugenia_uniflora

A Thai friend introduced these to me, and not long afterwards I found two of them in Bangkok (Ladprao 130 and Rama 3 Soi 87 = Soi Amon), and whenever I pass and they are ripe (dark red versus light red when raw), I pick some from the tree or from the ground.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/42/Eugenia_uniflora_fruits.jpg

Phyllanthus acidus (Otaheite gooseberry, Malay gooseberry, Tahitian gooseberry, Country gooseberry, Star gooseberry, Starberry, West India gooseberry, Gooseberry tree, มะยม)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phyllanthus_acidus

Threes are indeed hanging full of these fruit as in the picture. I either bought or picked some of them, hard and bitter, not edible by my standards. Just looking at the picture makes me shudder!

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/2/20/Otaheite_gooseberry.JPG/800px-Otaheite_gooseberry.JPG

Phyllanthus emblica (emblic, emblic myrobalan, myrobalan, Indian gooseberry, Malacca tree, amla, มะขามป้อม)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phyllanthus_emblica

I bought these at a market (20 THB for 10 fruits about 30-35mm diameter), and vaguely remember them to be too hard and too bitter for my taste.

http://www.slowlife.company/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/banner62.png 

Eriobotrya japonica (loquat, Japanese medlar, Japanese plum, Chinese plum, Japanische Wollmispel, Chinese: 枇杷; pinyin: pípá) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loquat 

Loquat is linguistically related to Kumquat, but not botanically. 
I saw these recently (Mar2018) in Taiwan, and after asking a friend about the taste, I bought a pack (100 TWD = 110 THB for the one shown; same mass of bigger fruit more expensive; all I have seen packed as lavishly as the one shown in picture). But it was worth the money, they are delicious, similar to peach.


Copyright 2018 ChristianPFC

3 comments:

  1. Well done report on these fruits, and not covered by anyone else. Darn, you really could be the writer of the best ever book on Thailand.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hope you will manage to locate loquat somewhere in BKK for sale as you made me curious - peach is my second favorite fruit right after smoked porkloin

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  3. Don't forget to document the old fruits in Pataya.

    ReplyDelete

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